Tennessee Workplace Discrimination

Discrimination Leads to Nashville Wrongful Termination Lawsuit

by Staff Blogger | September 9th, 2015

Tennessee state law protects employees from discrimination based on factors such as sex, religion, gender, and race. That’s why one worker from Lebanon, Tennessee, filed a lawsuit against his former employer, claiming he faced workplace discrimination and wrongful termination because of his sexual preference.

The victim, who identifies as homosexual, was an on-site staffing coordinator for Abacus Corporation, a Lebanon-based staffing firm. The man says that he fired an employee for making discriminatory remarks and walking off of the job. He was then terminated from his position the next day.

The victim asked for a reason for his firing, but a termination letter explaining the company’s actions was never issued. This prompted the victim to file a lawsuit against his former employer on September 4.

According to an article from WKRN 2 News, the lawsuit is seeking $400,000 in damages for lost wages and benefits. The victim is also seeking an unspecified amount for damages including emotional distress, loss of quality of life, embarrassment, and humiliation.

The victim’s former employer has denied the allegations and says it will defend its position in court.

At Ponce Law, we know how difficult it can be to recover from being let go of a job. Our Nashville wrongful termination lawyers are hopeful that a resolution in this case brings a sense of closure to all parties involved.

Nashville Employment Lawyers Discuss Three Common Workplace Disputes

by Staff Blogger | March 11th, 2015

Employers in Tennessee have a right to hire and terminate employees at will, there are certain laws that protect workers in our state from being treated inappropriately on the job or paid unfair wages. The Nashville employment lawyers with Ponce Law explain there are three common violations of these laws:

  1. DiscriminationUnfair treatment of an employee due to his or her age, sex, gender, religion, or ethnicity is strictly forbidden in the Tennessee workplace. Individuals may also be discriminated due to sexual preference or a disability as well. The latter is specifically prohibited under the Americans with Disabilities Act.
  2. Wage DisputesState law protects workers from being required to work more than 40 hours per week without overtime pay. It also establishes the minimum wage an employer can pay workers. Any failure to abide by these regulations can result in a civil lawsuit.
  3. Sexual HarassmentThe Tennessee Employment Law Center explains that any sort of unwelcome sexual advance, conduct, or request is considered discrimination under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Furthermore, any act or conduct that significantly interferes with a worker’s performance and creates a hostile, intimidating, or offensive work setting can be considered sexual harassment.

If you’ve been the victim of an employer’s misconduct, it’s important to know that help is available. At Ponce Law, our legal staff is standing by to assist you any way we can, whether it’s answering your questions or helping you start the Tennessee employment dispute claims process. We can be reached by calling (800) 363-9113 anytime.

Changes Made to Tennessee Workplace Discrimination Law

by Staff Blogger | July 11th, 2014

The law prohibits employers from unfairly treating or terminating employees based on factors such as religion, sex, race, or sexual orientation. Violations of these laws can result in lawsuits against employers.

In the past, an employee who faced Tennessee workplace discrimination could seek both compensatory and punitive damages by filing a lawsuit. However, there have been several changes made to Tennessee state law that limit the awards that can now be received by employees who face discrimination at work.

An article from Mondaq explains that on July 1, reforms were made to the Tennessee Human Rights Act and the Tennessee Public Protection Act. These changes limit the amount of compensatory damages employees can receive for damages like emotional distress or humiliation. Furthermore, employers that discriminate no longer face the threat of punitive damages.

The standards for proof for whistleblower cases in the state have also been altered. Now, a whistleblower must make a complaint about their mistreatment to a person outside of the company. They must also prove their claims of illegal activity are the reason for their termination or mistreatment at the workplace.

At Ponce Law, we understand the intricacies of employment law in Tennessee, and we are here to answer any questions you may have about employment disputes. Call our team of Nashville personal injury lawyers today.